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Know Your Community - Demographics

Learn the demographic, socioeconomic, and health status characteristics of the Minnesota counties and cities you serve.

Demographic characteristics and socioeconomic status can influence a person's health behaviors, affect access to health care, and indicate an increased likelihood of certain health conditions. Several data sources are available that can assist health care organizations in learning more about the characteristics of the communities they serve so they can develop the culturally sensitive services and processes necessary to support delivery of equitable and effective health care.

DemographicsSocio-Economic StatusHealth Status Data

Demographics

Demographic data reveal the following state-level trends:

  • Minnesota’s population is projected to grow substantially by 2035, with slight growth in younger age groups and substantial growth in older age groups. These changes will influence the overall age composition of the state.
  • Gender is evenly distributed across age groups, with notable exceptions in the older age groups which have a larger proportion of females.
  • Minnesota’s population continues to become more diverse. Between 2010 and 2016, populations of color in Minnesota increased by 20.1% and the white population increased by 0.9%. The Minnesota population overall increased 4.1% during that timeframe.
Man and eldery woman in wheelchair

Age

Between 2012 and 2035, the population of Minnesotans over age 65 is predicted to more than double due to greater longevity. By contrast, the population under age 65 will grow by only 9%. As a result, the age composition of all parts of the state will be much older in 2035.

Age data sources

Community Profiles for Twin Cities Area. Information and trends about the Twin Cities region or any city, county or township. Includes charts and data on population, employment, income and poverty, housing, commuting, land use, and development. Metropolitan Council

Minnesota Immigrant Population 2000-2015. Statewide data on various immigrant populations, includes population size; age; gender; length of time in the U.S.; as well as status of English speaking, poverty, workforce participation, and education attainment, among other data points. Minnesota Compass

Population Estimates and Projections. Historical and emerging patterns in births, deaths, and migration. Minnesota Demographic Center

What providers need to know

The proportion of Minnesota’s older population, as well as ethnic and immigrant communities, will grow faster than the rest of the state’s population in the next 25 years. Consider whether your organization is prepared to meet the special needs of these populations.

Suggestions

Become familiar with the needs of older populations, as well as individuals from diverse backgrounds, and develop strategies to accommodate them, including: referrals to transportation services, allowing more time for patient encounters, incorporating age related issues such as hearing screens into preventive services and providing patient education materials in alternative formats.

Gender

As of 2017, gender distribution in Minnesota is 49.7% male and 50.3% female. Although Minnesota population is projected to increase, gender distribution is expected to remain roughly the same through 2070.

Gender data sources

Community Profiles for Twin Cities Area. Information and trends about the Twin Cities region or any city, county or township. Includes charts and data on population, employment, income and poverty, housing, commuting, land use, and development. Metropolitan Council 

Minnesota Immigrant Population 2000-2015. Statewide data on various immigrant populations, includes population size; age; gender; length of time in the U.S.; as well as status of English speaking, poverty, workforce participation, and education attainment, among other data points. Minnesota Compass

Mother and son

Race

Minnesota’s population is less diverse than the U.S. population. Minnesota’s populations of color accounted for 19% of the population in 2017, compared with 37.8% of the national population. Populations of color are projected to grow in Minnesota, reaching 25%.by 2035, compared to 45.2% of the national population.

Race data sources

American FactFinder. A portal which provides drill-down access to data from the U.S. Census, other censuses, and major surveys. United States Census Bureau

Community Profiles for Twin Cities Area. Information and trends about the Twin Cities region or any city, county or township. Includes charts and data on population, employment, income and poverty, housing, commuting, land use, and development. Metropolitan Council

Population Estimates and Projections. Historical and emerging patterns in births, deaths, and migration. Minnesota Demographic Center

Minnesota Immigrant Population 2000-2015. Statewide data on various immigrant populations, includes population size; age; gender; length of time in the U.S.; as well as status of English speaking, poverty, workforce participation, and education attainment, among other data points. Minnesota Compass

What providers need to know

The health issues, health-seeking behaviors, cultural norms, and communication preferences of populations of color vary considerably. As Minnesota’s population becomes more diverse, patient populations and the work force within the state’s health care organizations will become more diverse as well.

Suggestions

Get to know your patients and staff on an individual level. Not all your patients and staff from diverse populations conform to commonly known culture-specific behaviors, beliefs, and actions. Understanding an individual’s practice of cultural norms can allow providers to quickly build rapport and ensure effective health care communication.

Foreign Born

Minnesota's population growth between 2000 and 2010 was driven by an increase in minority residents that accounted for more than 80% of the state's growth. Minority residents now make up about one of every seven state residents. In 2009, one third Minnesota's immigrant population came from four countries: Somalia (23%), Ethopia (9%), Kenya (6%) and Liberia (6%).

Minnesota’s foreign born population has increased from 6.9% in 2010 to 8.2% in 2016, which is a faster rate of increase than the national rate of 12.9% to 13.5% during that timeframe. The top twelve countries of origin for Minnesota’s foreign born population are Mexico, India, Laos, Somalia, Vietnam, China, Thailand, Ethiopia, Korea, Canada, Liberia, and Kenya.

Foreign born data sources

Minnesota Immigrant Populations, 2000-2015. Statewide data on various immigrant populations, includes population size; age; gender; length of time in the U.S.; as well as status of English speaking, poverty, workforce participation, and education attainment, among other data points. Minnesota Compass

Family of three smiling

Language

The most common language spoken in Minneapolis-St. Paul-Bloomington, MN-WI Metro Area in 2015, other than English, was Spanish with 4% of the overall population being native speakers. This was followed by African Languages with 1.77% and Hmong with 1.59%.

Language data sources

Immigration and Language. Explore characteristics and languages of immigrants to Minnesota from Mexico, Somalia, Laos, India, and other countries. Minnesota State Demographic Center

Minnesota Immigrant Populations, 2000-2015. Statewide data on various immigrant populations, includes population size; age; gender; length of time in the U.S.; as well as status of English speaking, poverty, workforce participation, and education attainment, among other data points. Minnesota Compass

What providers need to know

Language barriers pose a challenge to even the most basic clinical encounters. According to the U.S Department of Health and Human Services, Office of Minority Health:

  • Health care organizations must offer and provide language assistance services, including bilingual staff or interpreter services, at no cost to each patient/consumer with limited English proficiency (LEP) at all points of contact, in a timely manner, during all hours of operation.
  • Family and friends should not be used to provide interpretation services.

Next Steps

  • Conduct a CLAS (Culturally and Linguistically Appropriate Services) Standards Assessment to identify areas of strength and areas of opportunities for improvement in the services your organization offers to diverse populations. An online assessment which offers customized evaluation and recommendations, can be found at: CLAS Standards Assessment
  • Find actionable tools in support of providing culturally and linguistically appropriate services on this Culture Care Connection website.
  • Contact Stratis Health to learn more about how we can assist in your organization's efforts to enhance culturally competent care.

DemographicsSocio-Economic StatusHealth Status Data